Understanding the TAN Function in Looker Studio: Features, Syntax, Practical Applications, Limitations, and Tips for Optimal Usage

 Understanding the TAN Function in Looker Studio: Features, Syntax, Practical Applications, Limitations, and Tips for Optimal Usage

Trivial as it may seem, the TAN function in Google Data Studio is a useful tool that accurately calculates the tangent of a given angle in radians, and thereby, assists in the portrayal of data in a clear and concise manner.

How Does the TAN Function Work?

Displayed as TAN(X), the TAN function in Google Data Studio represents 'X' as a field or an expression containing at least one field. It must be emphasized that the measurement value of 'X' should be in radians for the function to work accurately.

The mechanism of the TAN function lies in it returning the tangent of the input angle, wherein the input angle is quantified in radians. To ensure the proper working of the function, the parameters must be set correct, i.e., accurate measurement in radians must be ensured while using the function.

A Dive into the Function's Syntax

The syntax of the TAN Function can be summarized as TAN(X). Subsequent to recognizing the measurement unit of 'X' as radian, usage of the function will provide a seamless experience. Herein, 'X' represents a field or an expression that consists of at least one field. The noteworthy factor is to guarantee that the value of 'X' should be in radians for an optimal outcome.

TAN Function in Action: Practical Examples with Sales Metrics

Let's bring this function to life using some practical examples, considering sales metrics. Assume the tangent of the angle signifies the sales growth rate. We will input the angle in radians. Take a look at the following scenarios:

  1. Scenario-1:

The Formula:

TAN([0.52359877])

In this instance, the 'X'(angle in radians) value is '0.52359877' (which is approximately equivalent to 30 degrees). When you apply the TAN function in this scenario, your output will render as '0.577', representing a moderate sales growth rate.

  1. Scenario-2:

The Formula:

TAN([1.04719755])

In this case, the value of X is '1.04719755' (equivalent to approximately 60 degrees). Running the TAN function renders the output as '1.732', which signifies a much robust sales growth rate.

Delving into the Function's Limitations

Relative to its functioning, the TAN function in Google Data Studio may not return accurate results if the value is input in units other than radians, thereby indicating a limitation in usability.

Indispensable Tips for Utilizing the TAN Function

When using the TAN function, the tip to remember is to ensure that the input value (angle) is in radians. Doing so guarantees the correct output. While the function may seem complex initially, effective usage can provide a wealth of insights to guide business decisions.

In conclusion, the TAN function is an invaluable asset in Google Data Studio, and harnessing its power can uplift your data analysis capabilities to a new notch. Happy Data Analysis!

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